Recycle Is Green
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Welcome to Recycle Is Green (RIG)

RIG specializes in recycling non-ferrous scrap metal. By using RIG for your recycling needs you can be confident your metal is being processed properly to recover the highest level of metallic’s contained. RIG is interested in developing long term relationships with our customers who are interested in receiving the best value for their scrap metal.

RIG was developed to offer manufacturers, scrap yards & metal brokers a place to sell their non-ferrous scrap metal with the confidence they will be receiving the best pricing as well as the best service in the industry. Our business is built on integrity after witnessing improper metal processing & testing, payment delays and pricing fraud which seems to be prevalent in the scrap industry.

RIG passion for metal recycling has created long term partnerships with top non-ferrous manufactures.  We are extremely cautious in regard to the environment and properly dispose of all pollutants during the processing of your scrap. We use large collection pads for draining oils and the removal of other hazardous contaminants before any water leaves our facilities.

Our smelting operations uses air filtration systems to filter and capture particulates that are harmful to the environment. We never send any metallic scrap including drosses to the land fill for your peace of mind.

We look forward to providing you a safe profitable source to sell your non-ferrous scrap metal.

RIG is in Compliance with EPA local, state and federal regulatory agencies.


HAZARDOUS vs. NON HAZARDOUS
SOLDER DROSS AND OXIDE - HAZARDOUS
Oxidized solder that is skimmed from the top of molten solder

SOLDER SOLID - NON HAZARDOUS
Solder in a solid state containing no oxides or powders
"RIG" Tin Industry Updates

This year the market has been heading strongly upwards and the question is how high prices can go. The driver of both the fall and the recovery has been tin consumption, which nose-dived from October/November 2008 and hit bottom around February/March last year.

In that period global demand dropped by about 30% year-on-year, as a result of both lower sales of final tin-using products such as computers and cars and a huge inventory clear-out in the electronics industry supply chain.

However demand steadied and recovered in the second half of last year, helped by enormous (and unrepeatable) government monetary and fiscal stimulus packages and has bounced back strongly in 2010. 

The world refined tin demand will rise by about 15% to some 345,000 tons this year – although this is still short of the all-time peak of over 360,000 tons reached in 2006.